Use Old Crayons To Make Candles.

Use Old Crayons To Make Candles.

No Comments Child Entertainment

If you have children in your home, chances are you have an abundance of worn down crayons that don’t get used much anymore. Before throwing them out and buying new ones, consider using them to make candles. This can be a great way to turn them into something new and bright again. Most children will love the idea of creating candles with you and enjoy knowing their old crayons helped create them. Making candles out of crayons can also be a great gift giving idea.

Before you get started, discuss safety with your children. Since the crayons will have to be melted at a very high heat, they will not be able to participate in that portion of the candle making process. Assure them that there are many other aspects of the candle making that they can be a part of. To start, gather your supplies. In addition to the crayons, you will need a wax cartoon. This can be from milk, fabric softener, or orange juice. You will also need paraffin wax, two full ice cube trays, a double boiler, and white packing string. If you don’t want to use your double boiler an old coffee can and a saucepan will work just as well.

Trim the top off of the wax carton, leaving it approximately six inches high. You will want to cut the string at least 8 inches long. You will later cut the wick to fit the holder. To ensure a wick that burns easier take three pieces and bread them together. Use smaller pieces of string to tie the ends together. The holders for your candles can be anything you desire as long as they are non-flammable. Pretty vases, glasses, and jars work nicely.

Melt about three pounds of paraffin wax in the double boiler or coffee can. To help it melt faster, cut it into small chunks. The melting process with take about fifteen to twenty minutes. While the wax is melting, peel the papers off of the old crayons. You and your children can choose to separate the colors by lights and darks to have a mix that melds well or you can mix it all together and see what the color ends up being.

For best results, only add the crayons to the wax after it has completely melted. After the crayons and wax have both melted together, immediately remove the mixture from the stove and pour into your candle holders. If you would like to make scented candles try adding a splash of cinnamon or vanilla to your hot wax mixture.

It is important that the candles by left alone to completely harden. Make sure you have an area this can be done without disruption. It is also important to make sure small children can’t reach them, as out of curiosity they may want to check on their candles. The wax will stay hot for several hours and can scold the skin.

Making candles out of old crayons is a great way to spend the afternoon creating a neat project with your children. This process can also be done at schools and childcare centers with old crayons as presents for parents. Simply allow each child to decorate the outside of their candle holder while adults complete the rest of the process.

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